Friday, April 17, 2015

 

The 58th San Francisco International Film Festival (SFIFF58)

It's delightful to see the longest running film festival in America, the San Francisco International Film Festival (SFIFF), once again returns with an excellent selection of films and programs during April 23 - May 7, 2015. In this 58th edition, the festival showcases 65 narrative features, 35 documentary features, six shorts programs in 33 languages (or the lack of) representing 46 countries.

The 58th San Francisco International Film Festival

The festival opens on April 23 with Academy Award-winning documentarian Alex Gibney's new film "Steve Jobs: Man in the Machine" (USA 2015 | 120 min. | Documentary) about, well, Steve Jobs. On May 2, the festival's centerpiece presentation is James Ponsoldt's "The End of the Tour" (USA 2015 | 106 min) about two celebrated writers, the late David Foster Wallace and David Lipsky. On May 7, the festival closes with Michael Almereyda's biographical drama "Experimenter" (USA 2015 | 90 min.) about the social psychologist Stanley Milgram who conducted human obedience experiments.

Besides these Big Nights, the SFFF58 categorizes its films into seven sections:

  • Marquee Presentations—18 films that contain the top talent and buzz-worthy titles in the festival circle and in the film industry.
  • Masters—12 works from renowned filmmakers around the globe.
  • Golden Gate Award (GGA) Competition—19 narrative and documentary features films, as well as short films in six shorts programs, as the festival's official selection to compete nearly $40,000 in cash prizes.
  • Global Visions—32 films that sample the best new works among filmmakers around the world.
  • Dark Wave—four films for midnight horror thrill and silly laugh seekers.
  • Vanguard—four experimental films that bring new and challenging cinematic experience.
  • Added Programs—five added films that are not included in the above sections, nor in the printed film-guide.

Throughout the SFFF58, besides film screenings, there are also Tributes and Awards, as well as four Live & On Stage programs and three Master Classes.

The 58th San Francisco International Film Festival takes place April 23 - May 7, 2015 in San Francisco at Sundance Kabuki, Landmark's Clay Theatre, Castro Theater, Roxie Theater, and Brava Theater Center, in Berkeley at Pacific Film Archive, and other venues around the Bay Area.

Here is a list of my recommendations. As always, each film's title is linked to the festival program which has the showtime and venue information. Each film's still image is linked to a film's official Web site if it's available. In random order (more titles to be added):

  • A Hard Day (끝까지 간다 | South Korean 2014 | in Korean | 111 min.)
  • The Iron Ministry (铁道 | China/USA 2014 | in Mandarin | 82 min. | Documentary)
  • The Tribe (Плем'я | Ukraine 2014 | in Ukrainian sign language | 130 min.)
  • Dearest (亲爱的 | China 2014 | in Mandarin | 130 min.)
  • The Taking of Tiger Mountain (智取威虎山 | China 2014 | in Mandarin | 143 min.)
  • Black Coal, Thin Ice (白日焰火 | China 2014 | in Mandarin | 106 min.)
  • Red Amnesia (闯入者 | China 2014 | in Mandarin | 116 min.)
  • Hill of Freedom (자유의 언덕 | South Korea 2014 | in Korean | 66 min.)

  • A Hard Day (끝까지 간다 | South Korean 2014 | in Korean | 111 min.)

    The South Korean writer-director Kim Seong-hoon's (김성훈) sophomore feature is an immensely entertaining crime thriller "A Hard Day." When I first saw it on a tiny screen during an oversea flight last year, I was completely captivated by its sleek storytelling and charming humor. I am overjoyed to be able to see this film again on the big screen at the festival and to appreciate Kim's carefully constructed plot and to giggle at his jokes.

    The detective Go Geon-soo (Lee Sun-kyun 이선균) isn't just having a hard day, he is probably having the worst day ever in his life. First of all, his mom is dead. On the way to a funeral home to seal his mom's coffin, he involves in an accident. At the same time, the Internal Affairs Department raids his office and found large amount of dirty cash in his desk. Because Go has been drinking before the accident, his effort to cover up the aftermath results in worse consequences. Just when he thinks he might have taken care of all the loose ends, somebody begins to come after him, hard. A bad day turns into a life and death battle.

    A Hard Day Official Site

    Like the elegant style in many recent Korean films, the director Kim Seong-hoon hardly wastes any frame for unessential details. He scatters clues while unfolding the story and then make everything impeccably fit together. Popular Korean actor Lee Sun-kyun's performance is both comical and convincing playing the bad-luck detective Go.

    The film's sense of humor is simple irresistible. When the credit starts to roll, the ring-tone music used by a cellular phone in the film will make you walk away with a big smile. The film is pure entertainment from start to finish.

    Go back to the list of titles


  • The Iron Ministry (铁道 | China/USA 2014 | in Mandarin | 82 min. | Documentary)

    Before high speed bullet trains become common in recent years, traveling by rail in China might be a both devastating and fascinating experience. It was noisy, dirty, smoky, and extremely crowded. Yet, it was also a place where you can strike up a candid conversation with complete strangers about sensitive subjects without worrying about getting into trouble. The American director J.P. Sniadecki's observant documentary "The Iron Ministry" provides a glimpse of that unique but fast disappearing experience.

    Over a three-year period, the documentarian J.P. Sniadecki, who can speak Chinese, took numerous rides on China's railway system and captured large amount of footage on the trains. Some of the images are exotic and eye-popping. For example, it becomes rare these days to see peasants who board trains with gigantic baskets full of produces and fresh meat to be sold in the market.

    The Iron Ministry Official Site

    Besides ordinary Chinese travelers on the train, the film also records many mesmerizing images both inside and outside a train that reflect the social, economic, and environmental changes in China. However, some of the scenes, such as a vending cart that travels in a crowded aisle, are unnecessarily and noticeably way too long.

    After quite a few minutes into the film, there is no dialogue or voice-over in the sound track except the sound of the tracks. But just when I thought this might be another documentary in the same style as the compelling "Our Daily Bread" (Unser täglich Brot 2005), the travelers begin to talk in the film. That isn't a bad thing! Otherwise, we would have missed an amusing scene in which a naughty young boy recites a popular standup monologue (三八列车) in his cute voice pretending to be a public announcement.

    The rapid transformation in China also dramatically changes the experience of railroad travel. Instead of chatting with each other in crowed and filthy space, modern travelers are usually preoccupied with their own hand-held devices in spacious high speed trains.

    Although this film doesn't form an opinion or make a point of any sort, it does offers an eye-opening peek into the railway travel experience in China that's even hard to find nowadays.

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  • The Tribe (Плем'я | Ukraine 2014 | in Ukrainian sign language | 130 min.)

    The Ukrainian write/director Miroslav Slaboshpitsky's (Мирослав Слабошпицький) triumphant feature directorial debut "The Tribe" is a must-see at the festival. Without a single word or a line of subtitle and superbly performed by a group of young non-professional deaf actors, the film unflinchingly tells an engrossing story about the barbarous life in a boarding school for the deaf.

    Soon after a teenager Sergey (Grygoriy Fesenko) arrived at his new boarding school, he realizes that the school is an isolated brutal domain that is ruled by violence. He quickly joins the gang that routinely steals, robs, and pimps out two girls Anna (Yana Novikova) and Svetka (Roza Babiy) to truckers at night. When Sergey falls in love with Anna, things get complicated and out of control.

    The Tribe Official Site

    The director Miroslav Slaboshpitsky masterfully creates an astonishing cinema experience that's eerily raw and deeply compelling. This is probably a completely different movie to you if you understand Ukrainian sign language, but for most audience, it's an unforgettable film that will shake all of your senses, including hearing.

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  • Dearest (亲爱的 | China 2014 | in Mandarin | 130 min.)

    A favorite to the SFIFF, the Hong Kong director Peter Chan (陈可辛) returns to the festival with his latest film "Dearest." This tear-jerking melodrama tells a heart-breaking story about the searching of a kidnapped child in China.

    Based on a true event on 18 July 2009 in Shenzhen, three-year-old Pengpeng is kidnapped while playing on the street in his neighborhood. His divorced parents Tian Wen-jun (Huang Bo 黃渤) and Lu Xiaojuan ( Hao Lei 郝蕾) start an exhausting and desperate search for Pengpeng. The search leads them to cross the path with a local village woman Li Hongqin (Zhao Wei 赵薇) in Anhui Province, who is on the other side of the fence—she is trying everything possible to keep her child from being taken away by the child protection agency. Regardless of the outcome of the story, many grief-ridden hearts are vividly on display.

    Dearest Official Site

    What's remarkable about this film is that even you are expected to be pampered by the director Peter Chan with sentimental materials, you can't help but to become deeply emotional while watching the melodrama unfold. The film's success is greatly due to a tour de force performance by the immensely popular actress Zhao Wei (赵薇), who speaks her native Anhui dialect in the film. She magically shakes your moral ground and makes her character sympathetic.

    Unlike Hirokazu Koreeda's "Like Father, Like Son" (そして父になる 2013) which raises philosophical questions about parenting, this film exposes the harsh reality when parents lose a child.

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  • The Taking of Tiger Mountain (智取威虎山 | China 2014 | in Mandarin | 143 min.)

    Almost everyone in China knows the eight model operas and ballets (样板戏) from the notorious Cultural Revolution era. One of them is a Beijing Opera called "Taking Tiger Mountain by Strategy" (智取威虎山) based on true stories told in a novel by Qu Bo (曲波). Therefore, it's no surprise that everyone in China also knows the story line in this famous opera even for someone who doesn't know what happens in Romeo and Juliet. But considering how many films called Romeo and Juliet have been made over the years, it's surprising that the Hong Kong director Hark Tsui's (徐克) "The Taking of Tiger Mountain" is only the second time for this story to be told in a movie. But Hark Tsui doesn't adapt the story lightly. He makes the film with his action flick signature and turns it into a 3D extravaganza. On top of that, he even throws in an action sequence involving an airplane, just for fun.

    The well-known story is about a heroic reconnaissance comrade Yang Zirong (Zhang Hanyu 张涵予) who single-handedly infiltrates into the compound of a brigand gang in the snowy Mountain Fierce Tiger (威虎山) in 1946. With his bravery and wit, Yang Zirong (杨子荣) gains the trust of the ruthless gang leader Hawk (Tony Ka Fai Leung 梁家辉) and becomes the ninth ranking officer in the gang. Based on the intelligence Yang Zirong collects, despite the extreme disadvantage due to the harsh environment and the imbalance in ammunition power, a small team of Chinese Army led by Shao Jianbo (Lin Gengxin 林更新) successfully attack and wipe out the bandits who have made the people's lives in the area miserable.

    The Taking of Tiger Mountain Official Site

    To add some new life to this legendary well-known story, the director Hark Tsui not only pitches in an airplane and plenty eye-popping action sequences in 3D, but also adds a new fictional character Qing Lian (Yu Nan 余男) who was taken by Hawk (座山雕) as his woman, separated from her son. Although the human drama element is formulaic, it's minor compared to the overall entertaining experience created by the genre master.

    If you have missed the theatrical run a few months ago in the Bay Area, this maybe the last chance for you to watch this exciting revival of an iconic model opera, in 3D!

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  • Black Coal, Thin Ice (白日焰火 | China 2014 | in Mandarin | 106 min.)

    At last year's 64th Berlin International Film Festival, the Chinese writer-director Diao Yi'nan's (刁亦男) sleuth story "Black Coal, Thin Ice" (白日焰火) won the top prize Golden Bear, and the film's lead actor Liao Fan Liao Fan (廖凡) becomes the first ever Chinese actor winning Silver Bear for Best Actor. It's a little perplexing that this film has not been shown in the Bay Area yet until now at SFIFF58. But late is surely better than never and this award-winning film maybe still fresh to many local film goers.

    The film opens in the winter of 1999 in Heilongjiang Province. When body parts of a murder victim are discovered at various coal plants, detective Zhang Zili (Liao Fan 廖凡) investigates this mysterious crime with his colleagues. The victim is identified as Liang Zhijun (Wang Xuebing 王学兵) whose wife Wu Zhizhen (Gwei Lun-mei 桂纶镁) works at a dry-cleaning shop. When an arrest goes wrong, two cops are killed and Zhang is injured. The case remains unresolved.

    Five years later, Zhang Zili is no longer a detective and he works in the security department in a factory and drinks heavily. When he learns that another murder happens in the area, he decides to pursue the clues he discovers that link to the murder five years ago. The deeper he digs, the more surprising truth surfaces.

    Black Coal, Thin Ice Official Site

    To have an ambiance of film noir, the director Diao Yi'nan arranges most scenes to happen at night or indoors, and in the film you cannot see the beauty of gorgeous and exquisite Harbin (where I grew up). It fits the gloom mood of just about every character in the film. Despite that the story unfolds during winter time, you won't see a trace of the famously breathtaking ice and snow festival. The film's striking image gives you chill all the way into your bone, as cold as the hearts of some of the characters.

    Although that's remarkably effective, the storytelling is not so and actually confusing at times. If you don't understand the dialogue, you really need to pay close attention to the subtitles while its protagonist solves an overly complex puzzle.

    If you miss a few clues during the first viewing, maybe you should go to a second screening to revisit them while marveling the filmmaker's craftsmanship.

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  • Red Amnesia (闯入者 | China 2014 | in Mandarin | 116 min.)

    Although it has been almost 40 years since the end of the Cultural Revolution in China, its immense impact on the lives of several generations still lingers. It also continues to be an important and fascinating subject for filmmakers to explore. By making a trilogy, renowned Chinese director Wang Xiaoshuai (王小帅) tells compelling story about the damage caused by the Cultural Revolution. Following his terrific "Shanghai Dreams" (青红 | 2005) and "11 Flowers" (我11 2011), the last installment of the trilogy is a thriller "Red Amnesia" about an elderly widow who struggles with an intruder she describes.

    Red Amnesia Official Site

    After competed for the Golden Lion at the 71st Venice International Film Festival, the film is shown at SFIFF58 even few days earlier than its opening day in China on April 30, 2015. Festival goers are in for a treat to see an outstanding performance by the 75-year-old Lü Zhong (呂中) as the widow Deng.

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  • Hill of Freedom (자유의 언덕 | South Korea 2014 | in Korean | 66 min.)

    A longtime SFIFF habitué, the South Korean prolific auteur Hong Sang-soo (홍상수) is a master of telling a story in an ordinary setting, often just letting his characters sit and talk at a bar or a restaurant. I identified two common characteristics of his films four years ago: he is obsessed about exploring the courtship of men toward women, and he loves to see his characters drinking. He continues to validate my theory when he returns to SFIFF with his latest film "Hill of Freedom." It's about a Japanese language teacher Mori (Kase Ryo 加瀬 亮) comes to Seoul to look for her ex-lover Kwon (Seo Young-hwa 서영화) who he met two years ago. He sits in a cafe (where else?) called "Hill of Freedom" owned by Young-sun (Moon So-ri 문소리) and writes love letters to Kwon.

    Hill of Freedom Official Site

    After competed for the Horizons Prize at the 71st Venice International Film Festival last year, the film is labeled as Best Undistributed Films in 2014 by New Yorker and Indiewire. You know what that means to you—don't miss it at the SFIFF58 because it will not come to a theater near you any time soon. And, when you go to see the film, order a drink to your seat to set the mood just like the film's characters (if you are over 21 of course).

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True Story

True Story official site Does every story deserve to be told, even it's a story from somebody who is accused of horrendous murders? Absolutely! Especially if you ask a defamed former The New York Times reporter Michael Finkel, who had been impersonated by Christian Longo, a fugitive on the FBI's most-wanted list. Michael Finkel believed that there was a bigger story underneath the surface, and it seemed to be a perfect opportunity for him to comeback by digging into this story. Based on his correspondent with Christian Longo, Michael Finkel wrote a book called "True Story: Murder, Memoir, Mea Culpa." The British writer/director Rupert Goold adapts the book into an intriguing but unsatisfying film "True Story" (USA 2014 | 100 min.).

The film starts with a horrific scene of recovering a suitcase that contains a girl's body from a river. Her father Christian Longo (James Franco) is wanted as the suspect for killing his wife and his three young children. Not long into the film, he is captured in Mexico and brought back to Oregon for trial.

Meanwhile, a rising The New York Times reporter Michael Finkel is fired (Jonah Hill) for fabricating a character in his story about slavery in Africa. Michael retreats back to Montana to be with his girlfriend Jill (Felicity Jones). When he gets a call from an Oregon reporter who tells him that the captured Christian Longo has been living under his identity, Michael Finkel's journalist instinct immediately kicks in. He hopes that if he can uncover the truth from the mysterious Christian Longo, he may bring back his credibility and rebuilds his career.

Against conventional wisdom, Michael Finkel makes frequent correspondences with Christian Longo until the end of the trial. During the process, Michael Finkel reflects on himself and makes candid confession to Christian Longo for the mistake he made. But can he get the truth in return from Christian Longo?

True Story Official Site

The director Rupert Goold makes a striking opening of the film and quickly grabs our attention with a devastating yet mysterious crime story he is about to tell. It's like a great pilot episode of a new TV series and you can't wait to see what's going to follow. It grippingly sets up a high bar and hints that there has more substance to come.

Unfortunately, that high hope never becomes materialized. Despite good performances by Jonah Hill and James Franco, the film fails to explore deeper into the mental world of Christian Longo, and it is also not successful in portraying the transition of Michael Finkel's attitude toward Christian Longo.

In the film, Michael Finkel has high hope for a breakthrough to regain his credibility as a journalist while seeking redemption by unearth the truth of a heinous crime. Similarly, the film also has a high ambition and sets up for an earthshaking drama to unfold. However, the truth often winks at us, but not in a nice way.

"True Story," a Fox Searchlight Pictures release, opens on Friday, April 17, 2015 in San Francisco Bay Area.


Friday, April 3, 2015

 

While We're Young

While We're Young official site Despite that the starting point of middle-age has been pushed to be older in recent decades, that doesn't help to ease the anxiety for many who turn 40. That's especially the case for a likable couple in the writer-director Noah Baumbach's entertaining but restrained comedy "While We're Young" (USA 2014 | 97 min.). The film playfully and truthfully depicts the couple's emotional dilemma when they reluctantly step into a new stage of their lives while reminiscing their fading youth.

The couple is happily married documentary filmmaker Josh Srebnick (Ben Stiller) and his film-producer wife Cornelia (Naomi Watts). Both in their 40s, they have no child like many of their friends do, but they appear to be mostly content with their life together in New York City. However, when it comes to Josh's career, it hits the stop sigh. Josh has been trying to finish his documentary about war and politics for ten years, yet his pride and resentment prevent him from getting help from his father-in-law Leslie Breitbart (Charles Grodin) who is a celebrated documentarian.

After their friends Marina (Maria Dizzia) and her husband (Adam Horovitz) just had a baby, Josh and Cornelia grasp for some fresh hair that doesn't smell like forty-something. They desperately want to hold on to their fast vanishing youth a little bit longer. When twenty-something Jamie (Adam Driver) and Darby (Amanda Seyfried) "accidentally" run into their life, Josh and Cornelia quickly befriend with them because their young friends seem to possess all the qualities that are longing for—free-spirited, eccentric, hippie-looking, bicycle-riding, artistic, and totally cool.

However, whether that newly-established unusual friendship can ease Josh's mid-life crisis remains to be seen.

While We're Young Official Site

As in many of his previous films, the "indie darling" writer-director Noah Baumbach offers plenty wittily funny and even philosophical lines for his well-crafted characters in this comedy. But if you are expecting this film to be as charming and hilarious as the Noah Baumbach's "Frances Ha" (2012), you might be disappointed. The tone is subdued and it lacks the quirkiness and energy as in his other films. Many comical moments are as predictable as in a typical Hollywood comedy, which is surprising for the filmmaker's reputation for providing unconventional materials in his films. For example, one episode of puking out evil into a bucket at an ayahuasca party doesn't seem to belong to this film at all. It rather looks familiar in an Adam Sandler's movie.

Like in his previous films, Noah Baumbach is keenly observant about contemporary pop-culture and brilliantly injects his commentaries into the discussion among his characters. Evidently, Josh's frustrating argument about documentary filmmaking is echoed by a recent article in The New York Times which analyzes the phenomenon that documentarians may be classified as journalists, storytellers, or advocates.

The performance by a fine ensemble cast is a terrific throughout the film. Ben Stiller gives his best performance in his career as a greying Josh who is exhausted both mentally and physically in the film.

This certainly isn't Noah Baumbach's best work, but it never bores and quite entertaining.

"While We're Young," an A24 release, opens on Friday, April 3, 2015 in San Francisco Bay Area.


Friday, March 6, 2015

 

CAAMFest 2015

For the third year, Center for Asian America Media (CAAM) presents its annual CAAMFest featuring film, music, and food. Similar like past two years, CAAMFest 2015 continues to provide a platform to exhibit CAAM's productions, as well as new works by Asian American filmmakers and emerging filmmakers from Asia.

CAAMFest 2015

This year's festival contains 109 films and videos representing twenty countries and territories. There are total 46 feature-length films, eight shorts programs, as well as a few musical and foodie events. The festival opens with a crowd-pleasing comedy "Seoul Searching" (USA 2014) at Castro Theater on March 12 and closes 10 days later on March 22 with PBS series "Lucky Chow" at New Parkway Theater.

One of the festival's most anticipated sections is CinemAsia. However, it doesn't contain any high profile film from Asia this year, and most films are either filmmakers' directorial debuts or their sophomore features.

CAAMFest 2015 takes place March 12-22, 2015 in San Francisco at Sundance Kabuki, New People Cinema, Castro Theater, and Great Star Theater, in Berkeley at Pacific Film Archive, in Oakland at New Parkway and Oakland Museum of California, and at other venues around the Bay Area.

Here are my reviews of a few films in the programs. As always, each film's title is linked to the festival program where you can find the film's showtime and venue information. Each film's still image is linked to a film's official Web site if it's available. In random order:


  • Seoul Searching (USA 2015 | in Korean/English | 105 min.)

    Based on his personal experience back in the '80s, the director Benson Lee's new crowd-pleasing comedy "Seoul Searching" is a perfect choice to open the festival and push us into the festive mood. Inspired by "The Breakfast Club" (USA 1985), this funny film is more entertaining than expected when it blends in political-incorrectness and Korean-style high melodrama.

    The story is set in the '80s when the Korean government sponsors a summer camp for Korean teenagers living abroad to learn their heritage and Korean culture. That creates a golden opportunity for these rebellious kids to party together without their parents' supervision. When boys meet girls and the East clashes with the West, these youngsters have their best time while learning more about themselves.

    Seoul Searching Official Site

    The most lovely and hilarious character in the film is scene-stealing smooth-talking Sergio Kim (Esteban Ahn) who is from Mexico. With his charming personality, it's no surprise that he is one of the boys who win over a girl's heart during the summer camp.

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  • Partners in Crime (共犯 | Taiwan 2015 | in Mandarin | 89 min.)

    Two years ago, the Taiwanese director Chang Jung-chi's (張榮吉) first narrative feature "Touch of the Light" (逆光飛翔 2012) tells an uplifting story about a blind musician and a dancer who follow their dreams. It was selected as Taiwan's foreign-language entry to the Academy Awards. However, his second narrative feature "Partners in Crime" tells a complete different kind of story. Despite its stylish look and fine performances by its cast, the film is neither compelling nor convincing.

    One morning on their way to school, three students run into the body of school-mate Hsiao Wei-chiao (Yao Ai-ning 姚爱宁). The trio are quite different—Huang Li-huai (Wu Chien-ho 巫建和) is a bully victim who desperately wants to make a friend; Yeh Yi-kai (Cheng Kai-yuan 邓育凯) is an athletic popular boy at school; and Lin Yong-chuan (Deng Yu-kai 郑开元) is a nerdy book worm.

    Although they don't know each other earlier, but the horrific tragedy brings them together and creates an unlikely bond. They are determined to find out how Wei-chiao died. Just when they think they are about to find out the truth, the course takes an unexpected turn.

    Partners in Crime Official Site

    The beginning of the film terrifically builds a mysterious atmosphere and introduces its intriguing protagonists. But the film doesn't hold on the momentum and is unable to deliver the final act of the magic. The more twists it adds, the more ludicrous it sounds. In the end, none of these characters hold our interests.

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  • My Fair Wedding (South Korea 2014 | in Korean | 94 min. | Documentary)

    You might have seen plenty same-sex weddings in the US and other countries lately. But I am sure that you have never seen one in South Korea, unless you attended the one and only very public same-sex wedding which was held on the historical Gwangtonggyo Bridge (광통교 廣通橋) on September 7, 2013. The grooms were the Korean filmmaker Kim Jho Gwang-soo (김조광수) and film producer Kim "Dave" Seung-hwan (김승환) who had been together for nine years on that wedding day—D-day.

    The outgoing and vocal couple announced their wedding through press conferences and social media. The director Jang Hee-sun (장희선) documents the couple's process leading to their "D-day" in the documentary "My Fair Wedding" and conducts a series of interviews about the couple's motivation for the wedding and their relationship.

    Despite the 19 years age difference between Gwang-soo and Dave—Gwang-soo was 48 and Dave was 29 at the wedding time—they claimed to be very much in love and wanted to show it to the entire country, even to the world. Yet, the intimacy they expressed on screen seems extremely limited even when they are in private. When they are sitting on a couch during an interview, the space between them is clearly noticeable and their body language shows little affection. That makes me wonder if their wedding is just to put up a show and simply to make a public statement rather than to celebrate their love and commitment.

    My Fair Wedding Official Site

    It's also not a secret that they indeed want their wedding to be an entertainment event and they have a production team to produce the wedding ceremony. Clearly Gwang-soo and Dave were performing at the wedding with an extensive wardrobe (they could have taken some singing lessons). But how much are they performing in front of the camera of this documentary when they talk about themselves? That's hard to grasp.

    But one thing is certain that they do talk like a married couple who nag each other constantly, especially the more outgoing and flamboyant Gwang-soo. They all talk very fast and it's very hard to keep up with the tiny English subtitle. The frequent Korean-style pop-up text not only doesn't explain who is who better, but also becomes distracting and adds more chaos to the busy screen.

    The film is an eye-opening display of the same-sex marriage movement in the socially conservative South Korea. Unfortunately, the over-staged and heavy-orchestrated wedding production overshadows the very message that ceremony tries to deliver.

    I cannot find a trailer for the documentary, but many scenes in the following news footage also can be seen in the film:

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  • In Her Place (Canada 2014 | in Korean | 115 min.)

    The Korean-Canadian filmmaker Albert Shin's captivating sophomore feature "In Her Place" is a must-see at this year's festival. It patiently unfolds a heartbreaking story that revolves around three unnamed yet mesmerizing women.

    The film opens when a woman (Yoon Da-Kyung 윤다경) and her husband (Kim Kyung-Ik 김경익) arrives in their Mercedes at a modest farm house in a desolate village. A hard-working widowed mother (Kil Hae-Yeon 길해연) lives in the house with her shy teenage daughter (Ahn Ji-hye 안지혜) and a lovely dog. The woman is going to stay with the mother and the daughter for a few months.

    Gradually, it becomes clear that the girl is pregnant by a local boy (Kim Chang-hwan 김창환). To avoid the shame brought by the pregnancy, the mother plans a secret adoption by the woman once the baby is born. Meanwhile, the woman tells her friends that she is away to a relaxing vacation place to give birth.

    It seems a perfect plan to benefit everyone involved if everything goes according to the plan. But "life is full of surprises," as the mother tells the woman at the beginning of the film.

    In Her Place Official Site

    In this beautiful film, the director Albert Shin terrifically captures the complex and overwhelming emotions of his gripping characters. As if to fit the quiet and scenery countryside, he never rushes to explain the plot in his eloquent storytelling. He allows the characters to develop naturally and let the story progress to a stunning climax.

    Superbly performed by three fine Korean actresses, the three arresting protagonists are all good in nature and full of love. But one way or the other, they are also suffering. They are also full of hope, until the hope is crushed.

    Although Ahn Ji-hye (안지혜) is not a professional actress, she made her excellent screen debut playing the girl and wonderfully conveys the girl's inner-world with tremendous sensibility and subtlety.

    This unforgettable film is definitely the best film at this year's festival and is likely to be on my top-ten film list for 2015 even it's only March and nine more months to go.

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  • My Voice, My Life (爭氣 | Hong Kong 2014 | in Cantonese | 91 min. | Documentary)

    At last year's CAAMFest, Wu Hao's documentary "The Road to Fame" (成名之路 2013) tells a story about a group of talented students from a prestige drama university in China through the casting process of making a musical. This year, Academy Award-winning documentarian Ruby Yang (楊紫燁) brings her new film "My Voice, My Life" to the festival. Although this is also a film about the "making-of-a-musical," but her subjects can't be any more different—they are underprivileged or disabled students from four Hong Kong high schools.

    The film focuses on a few students including a handsome and rebellious Jason Chow who often causes trouble, a shy but optimistic Tsz Nok Lin who became blind last year, an academically challenged Ho Yin "Fat Yin" Hui who learns to communicate with his parents, and a talented Coby Wong who struggles with her self-confidence.

    These kids work hard under the direction and support of dedicated educators to make the musical a tremendous success. Along the process, they come of age and transform themselves and others around them.

    My Voice, My Life Official Site

    The director Ruby Yang is well known for discovering touching stories that reflect the social and economic reality in China which often escape the radar of mass media reporting. Her short film "The Blood of Yingzhou District" (颍州的孩子 2006) won her an Oscar for exposing the devastation of AIDS orphanages in a poor village in Anhui, China.

    This new film is no exception. The voices of these underprivileged teenagers are often buried by the noise of the fast-moving metropolitan life in Hong Kong. The film takes an up-and-close look at these youth and gives them a voice to express themselves, to bring awareness, to ignite hope, and to inspire the audience. It's impossible not to be moved by what these kids were experiencing in the film. When the soft-spoken Tsz Nok gives a heartfelt speech at the end of the musical to tell his mom that he is going to be alright even he becomes blind, there won't be any dry eye in the audience.

    You might not remember what the musical is called ("The Awakening 震動心炫" according to the press material) and what the musical is about (I did recognize a tune from the musical "Les Misérables", but it's not). However, it's the process of making the musical so meaningful for these teenagers and for the audience—thanks to this documentary in bringing the remarkable story to light.

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  • 0.5 mm (0.5 ミリ | Japan 2014 | in Japanese | 198 min.)

    Adopted from her own novel, the Japanese writer-director Andô Momoko's (安藤桃子) second feature "0.5 mm" tells a story about a quirky young woman's unorthodox way to make a living. This could have been a cute entertaining film if the film's running time were cut in half by only keeping the first half of the film.

    The young woman is the happy-go-lucky and clever Sawa (Andô Sakura 安藤サクラ—the director's younger sister) who works as a home care specialist for the elderly. She appears to be very nice and unable to refuse anything, even a very unusual request by her patient's family. However, when that doesn't go as planned, she loses her job and becomes homeless.

    But she quickly finds a new way to survive. Like a hunter with a sharp vision, she can easily spot lonely older men in public places. Once she finds her target, she uses both her charm and her natural-born con artist skill to blackmail these old folks so she is able to find a place to stay.

    Although that makes her sound like a criminal, Sawa is not a bad person at all. Quite contrary, she is caring, funny, and helpful to most of the old men she encounters.

    0.5 mm Official Site

    Sawa certainly is an interesting and colorful character. She could have been more endearing if the director Andô Momoko handled better with her material and cut some of her encounters off the film. It becomes repetitive when the film shows that she meets one old man after another with little connection among them. The routine never ends until more than three hours have passed without any new development to the character.

    Then the tone of the film takes a dramatic turn toward the end, as if the filmmaker cannot figure out a way how to end the film. After three hours, you are probably worn out and don't care what Sawa is doing in the end.

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